Roy Halladay - trend Dec 14
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Roy Halladay

Information about Roy Halladay

Wiki source

Halladay's fastball was clocked up to 95 mph (153 km/h), but it had little movement, and his pitches were up in the strike zone, which was ultimately the reason why his 2000 season was so unsuccessful. He worked with former Blue Jays pitching coach Mel Queen. The problem, Queen realized, was Halladay's total reliance on his strength—his attempt to overpower batters with straight-ahead pitches. Within two weeks, Halladay had altered his arm angle for a more deceptive delivery, and added pitches that sank and careened. Instead of throwing over the top, he chose to use a three-quarters delivery (the middle point between throwing overhand and sidearm). Originally a fastball pitcher, he became reliant on keeping his pitches low across the plate, regardless of the type of pitch thrown. The adjustments proved successful. After a month and a half, he was promoted to Double-A Tennessee, and a month later, to Triple-A Syracuse. By mid-season, he was back in the Blue Jays' rotation. He posted a 5–3 win–loss record with a 3. 19 ERA for the Blue Jays in 16 starts in 2001.